George Woodman (1932-2017) was a photographer and painter whose career has spanned over 60 years and included forays into diverse visual media. He was Professor Emeritus at the University of Colorado in Boulder where he taught painting and the philosophy of art. He was an influential figure in the Colorado art scene being associated for many years with Criss-Cross Art Communication and one of the founding members of the seminal Spark Gallery. Woodman’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States, Mexico and Europe including “19 Americans,” Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1981; “Pitti Rivisitato: Fotographie di George Woodman,” Palazzo Pitti, Florence, 1997; “Imagenes de Tiempo, Sensibilidad y Sombra,” Museo del Chopo, Mexico City, 1999; “Photographs of George Woodman,” Amethyst Gallery, Chennai, India, 2002; “Camera Obscura Photographs,” Grand Arts, Kansas City, MO, 2004. In 2006 he had an exhibition at Galerie Clara Maria Sels in Dusseldorf; a retrospective of 40 years of painting at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts in Omaha, Nebraska in 2007, and an exhibitions with accompanying books at Galleria Bagnai in Florence in 2010 and 2012. In the late 80s, Woodman’s work with pattern developed into compositions in ceramic tile, resulting in major commissions in Detroit, Michigan; Denver, Colorado; and Buffalo, New York. Woodman has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and The Bemis Project, and received the National Artist Award from the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Aspen, Colorado. His work is in the permanent collections of The Museum of Modern Art, The Guggenheim Museum, The Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Brooklyn Museum, among others. He has published critical essays and catalogue essays plus four books: “Museum Pieces” (Lo Specchio d’Arte, 1996); “The Further Adventures of Pinocchio,” with poems by Edwin Frank (Lo Specchio d’Arte, 2004); “How a Picture Grows a World,” with poems by Iris Cushing (Galleria Alessandro Bagnai, 2010) and “Metaphysics is to Metaphor as Cartography is to Departure” (Galleria Alessandro Bagnai, 2011). Woodman lived half of each year in New York and the other half in Antella, Italy.